Private Property

Pages Creek Dam and Trolley Way

The Story

Title of Object:

Page’s Creek Dam and Trolley Way.

Brief Description of Object:

Dam and remnant evidence of a tramway and pipeline.

Location of Object:

Located in thick scrub off Mirador Drive, Merimbula.

Accessibility of Object:

Although situated on public land and therefore accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week, the site is not signposted, is situated in thick natural bush and is difficult to locate, thus attempts to find and explore remnants of the tramway and / or dam without a knowledgeable guide is strongly discouraged.

History and Provenance of Object:

Merimbula’s historic tramway and Page’s Creek Dam were both constructed as part of the various infrastructure projects undertaken for the Munn’s Maizena enterprise.

Built in 1883 for Armstrong Lockhart Munn, the tramway was laid between Munn’s farm near Bournda and the maizena works in Merimbula. A report penned in May 1883 recorded that “The company have 1,000 acres of land in the neighbourhood of the [maizena] works, 110 acres of which are at present under corn, whilst improvements are being made to increase this to 200 acres. They have also a farm, three miles distant, where 80 acres are planted with corn, and where they expect within two years also to have 200 acres, 18 Chinamen being at present employed clearing the land…A tramway is in course of construction from the works to the outlying farm of which I have spoken.” Having Chinese labourers in his employ at the time, it is entirely possible that Munn had them engaged on the tramway construction project.

Reportedly about three to four metres in width, the tramway featured timber bridges with wooden piers across three deep gullies, the longest of which spanned approximately 35 metres. There were also dry stone rubble abutments of between two and five metres in height supporting these aspects of the line. Benched or cut into the steep hillside at points, drystone retaining walls of up to five metres in height provided the necessary stabilisation.

Writing from Bournda in November 1883, some months after that initial article and perhaps unaware of the existing construction work, a local correspondent commented that “There is some talk of a tramway being laid down by Mr. Munn, from the works at Merimbula to his farm near Bournda.” Then, in October the following year, while discussing the local steamship trade, it was highlighted that “…The Maizena works form an important branch of the trade and, recently Mr. Munn has spent large sums in constructing a tramway from [his farm near] Bournda…”

Shortly after it was built, part of the tramway line gained an auxiliary use when issues arose with the maizena works’ water supply.

From the 1860s water had been fed about 122 metres (400 feet) from Merimbula Creek through earthenware pipes to a well located near the maizena factory. By the 1880s, however, the supply was proving insufficient to meet demands and an alternative was necessary. In 1885 it was noted that “Some short time ago the [water] resources relied upon to supply the Maizena Works with this very necessary element failing to provide sufficiency of it, the manager, Mr. Munn, was compelled to ‘press the woolpack’ to divine how he could obtain supplies.”

Having noticed that Page’s Creek continued to flow even through the driest of droughts, he not surprisingly considered it an appropriate spot for construction of a dam. A local newspaper recorded that “Nearly two miles distant, to the north of the village, he knew there was a small spring reservoir, which he had watched so strictly during droughty times to feel assured that water was permanent in it. He then conceived the idea of having it brought into Merimbula, and made proposals to his company to this effect.” Although “…an engineer inspected the locale of the water and traversed the land wherein the necessary pipes would be laid, and condemned the proposal as an absurdity…” Armstrong Munn remained undeterred. He proceeded with his plan to have the dam constructed in a deep rainforest gulley along the creek, probably utilising a natural, solid rock foundation, and “…set to work personally to convey the water, by means of gravitation, to the mill, and has met with the best success.” Including almost three kilometres (one-and-a-half miles) of piping embedded at an average depth of about half a metre (18 inches), the cost of the project was reportedly around £300. The result was “…a permanent supply of water laid on to the mill, flowing at a rate of 5 gallons per minute…” Munn also concluded that “…the supply is not only sufficient to serve the requirements of the Maizena Works, but ample also to provide every home in Merimbula with water and he has it now under his consideration to lay the water on to any of them seeking it, for the reasonable sum of 2s per week…” Although proceeding adjacent to the tramway for some distance, the use of the alignment to lay the water supply pipe appears to have been an incidental use.

Highlighting the value of Armstrong Munn’s efforts, an 1885 report claimed that his “…great success as a cultivator of maize on indifferent soil...fades into significance when compared with his success in bringing water – fresh and pure – into Merimbula…”

With four two-inch outlet pipes at the base of the dam wall, water was initially gravity-fed down the gully before turning west along the hill above the lake to join the tramway route. Crossing the bridge over the Merimbula Creek, the pipe continued south towards Munn Street before turning west. It finally terminated at a reservoir about two-and-a-half metres (eight foot) deep and covering an area of nearly 48 hectares (118 acres) located on the site now (2019) occupied by the Woolworths supermarket. The Page’s Creek Dam continued to supply water to the maizena mill and later the bacon factory as well as some houses until water reticulation was introduced in Merimbula. After the original pipe rusted out, it was replaced with a galvanised line and in 1953, a branch at the eastern end ran across the lake to serve the Short Point camping ground.

Page’s Creek was named after Adam Kirkaldy Page, an early arrival in the district. The son of Samuel and Mary Ann Page, he was baptised at St. Mark Kennington Parish in the County of Surrey in November 1831. Arriving in Adelaide on board the Nederward in May 1853, his occupation was noted as a clerk. After working at Kameruka under James Manning, it was noted in April 1859 that Mr. Page “…formerly storekeeper at Kameruka…” was planning to open “…a large wholesale and retail store at Merimbula…” In August that year he advertised “…to inform the residents of Maneroo, Bega, and the surrounding districts, that he is about to open his extensive Stores newly erected at Merimbula, and that he will be fully prepared on the 1st September to offer all descriptions of goods at a very slight advance of Sydney process…” By this time, Adam was also serving as the Merimbula agent for the Illawarra Steam Navigation Company.

In December 1859 he married Martha Rixon in Bega and in 1861 their daughter Adelaide was born, the eldest of four girls and two boys. He was appointed a Magistrate in 1871 and in 1874 became a member of the Merimbula Public School Board; passing away in June the same year, aged just 40. He was buried in the Bega Cemetery.

Both the tramway and dam are listed on Schedule 5 of the Bega Valley Shire Council’s Local Environment Plan as well as being included in the Bega Valley Shire Heritage Study and the Merimbula Heritage Inventory.

Context:

Maizena production at Merimbula commenced in 1867 when Scottish born Matthew Adam Munn combined forces with Twofold Bay Pastoral Association members Thomas Sutcliffe Mort and Sir William Montague Manning to convert a stone and brick two-storey wheat flour mill for the processing of corn flour or maizena as it was known.

Special mill stones were imported from Scotland and a new plant of machinery was made for the purpose by McArthur and Co. of Waterview to plans furnished by Mr. Munn himself. By the time production commenced, the total cost of equipment and buildings amounted to more than £10,000.

Embarking on production of the fine white corn flour in July 1867, Munn applied to register the company trademark in November the same year of “A lion head, raised, with the word ‘Trade’ on the left hand side, and the word ‘Mark’ on the right hand side, in brackets; a band with ‘Omnia vincit veritas’, underneath”, intended for use on all labels and packaging.

Not surprisingly, the establishment of this local enterprise saw maize quickly become an economically crucial crop, and the factory took its place as one of the most commercially important businesses in the district. By 1868 the output was being exported for the Sydney market. Bran residue from the milling process was used as animal feed, with pig breeding becoming a profitable side industry. Up to five hundred were reputedly kept at any time and around 40 killed a week, the cured ham and bacon being sent to the metropolitan markets.

Loading sheds were located along the waterfront while Matthew Munn lived in a cottage just to the south of the factory. A wholesale depot for Merimbula’s maizena, as well as their hams, bacons and lard produced from the factory’s piggery, was established at Mort’s Wool Store in Phillip Street, Sydney.

In 1873, Munn's Maizena and Starch Company was formed to work the factory, the principal shareholders being Matthew Munn, Sir William and James Manning, and Sir Thomas Mort, and that year the works were described as “…one of the most praiseworthy of our colonial industries…” By then output stood at about one ton of corn flour a day, the maize being drawn principally from the surrounding districts.

After Matthew Adam Munn passed away on 12 August, 1873 at the age of 53, his son Armstrong Lockart Munn became the majority shareholder, taking over management and continuing the company’s success for many years. It was Armstrong who undertook construction of the tramway and the dam.

Munn’s Maizena continued to expand and grow, occupying a prominent position locally and beyond until, in 1913, the business changed hands with Mr. James Channon taking over. The enterprise finally closed down in 1918.

Fabric, design, manufacture and condition:

Remnants of two sections of the tramway still exist off Mirador Drive. These include dry stone abutments and retaining walls, earthworks including cuttings and embankments, and timber beams, posts and piers in various stages of decay. The track extends into a gully until terminating into a squared dry stone buttress or abutment with a maximum height of four metres. Roughly dressed logs were embedded in the buttress fill about one metre below the surface and formed the bridge decks.

That part of the tramway at the western end of the widest gully was buried during works in the area by land developers. Another 180 metres of the track and retaining wall was also irreparably damaged or destroyed during the laying of sewerage pipes for the Mirador development.

The dam includes the main concrete retaining wall with four two-inch pipes at the base, one at the south end with a stop valve, and three in the centre of the wall which are now completely rusted off at the concrete face. The floor is probably solid rock.

Both the tramway and dam site are at serious risk of further damage and/or permanent loss as a result of risk factors that include land and building development, increasing siltation, wild flora encroachment and lack of maintenance. Current and ongoing development in the area will only exacerbate the situation.

Maker:

Both reportedly built for Armstrong Lockart Munn.

Used by:

Munn’s Maizena Company.

Condition:

Poor and at serious ongoing risk of irreversible damage and / or loss.

Marks:

Production date:

Tramway - 1883

Dam – C. 1885.

Comparative examples:

Collection:

Description:

Works depicting/highlighting this object:

Historic photographs of this object:

Historic photographs associated with this object:

Contemporary photographs of this object:


The particular significance of this Object:

[Currently under development]

Themes:

Main theme:

NATIONAL THEMES

3: DEVELOPING LOCAL, REGIONAL AND NATIONAL ECONOMIES

STATE THEMES

Industry

LOCAL THEMES

Building and industrial development within Bega Valley Shire

Other themes:

NATIONAL THEMES

2: PEOPLING AUSTRALIA

3: DEVELOPING LOCAL, REGIONAL AND NATIONAL ECONOMIES

4: BUILDING SETTLEMENTS, TOWNS AND CITIES

5: WORKING

9: MARKING THE PHASES OF LIFE


STATE THEMES

Ethnic influences

Migration

Agriculture

Commerce

Technology

Transport

Towns, suburbs and villages

Land tenure

Utilities

Labour

Persons



LOCAL THEMES

Settler heritage in Bega Valley Shire

Coming to live in the Bega Valley Shire

Working the land in Bega Valley Shire

Economic survival in Bega Valley Shire

Technological innovation within Bega Valley Shire

Challenging terrains: Getting about in Bega Valley Shire

Constructing townships within Bega Valley Shire

Constructing boundaries within Bega Valley Shire

Amenity and liveability within the Shire

Working in Bega Valley Shire

Remembering and honouring the people of Bega Valley Shire

Thematic storylines:

  • Geological and natural heritage – River systems and waterways
  • Settling, developing and building the region
  • Developing the settlements, villages and towns - Land use patterns
  • Transport – Land
  • The development and evolution of transportation methods
  • Rural and regional industries
  • Rural and regional industries – Agricultural and pastoral
  • Rural and regional industries – Crops and grains.
  • Rural and regional industries – Pig raising
  • Utilities - Water
  • The economy and economic influences
  • Labour, working and employment
  • Notable people and families
  • Natural rivers and streams as community water sources

Geographically associated places / sites:

Associated / linked places / sites / items / people:

  • Merimbula Old School Museum
  • Courunga
  • Matthew Adam Munn
  • Armstrong Lockhart Munn
  • Munn family
  • Adam Kirkaldy Page
  • Thomas Sutcliff Mort
  • Sir William Montagu Manning
  • Twofold Bay Pastoral Association

Heritage listings (statutory and non-statutory):

Bega Valley Shire Council’s Local Environment Plan Schedule 5

Further information:

Contributors to this ‘library’:

Angela George, Pat Raymond and Merimbula-Imlay Historical Society Inc., April 2019.

Acknowledgements, Rights and Permissions:

Acknowledgement of Angela George and Pat Raymond.

© Angela George and Pat Raymond. All rights reserved.

References and bibliography:

  • Argus
  • Australian Town and Country Journal
  • Balfe, R. R., Shipping in Ports of the Bega Valley Shire Region, 1803 – 1846, October 1995, unpublished index
  • Bega Budget
  • Bega District News
  • Bega Gazette and Eden District or Southern Coast Advertiser
  • Bega Standard
  • Barnard, Alan, Mort, Thomas Sutcliffe (1816 - 1878), Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/mort-thomas-sutcliffe-4258
  • Bombala Herald
  • Brisbane Courier
  • Campbelltown Herald
  • Candelo and Eden Union and South Auckland Advocate
  • Cornell, John Bernard, Most Obedient Servants: One Hundred Years of Education in Government and Non-Government Schools, in the Former District of Twofold Bay, Comprising Today, the Counties of Dampier, Auckland, Wellesley and Beresford, J. Cornell, Cheltnam, NSW, 1994.
  • Courunga, State Heritage Register listing, NSW Heritage Office, http://www.heritage.nsw.gov.au/07_subnav_01_2.cfm?itemid=5045262
  • Empire
  • Evening News
  • Ferguson, B. J. (comp.) Merimbula: A Short History, Imlay District Historical Society, Merimbula, 1971.
  • Gallo, Beatrice and Barnett, Ray, When the Mill Came to Merimbula, Inkwell Publishing, Candelo, NSW, 1993
  • Heraldry and Genealogy Society of Canberra, Parish Register Index Church of England Diocese of Canberra and Goulburn, Heraldry and Genealogy Society of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, 2001
  • Hillston Spectator and Lachlan River Advertiser
  • Illawarra Mercury
  • Illustrated Australian News for Home Readers
  • Illustrated Sydney News
  • Land
  • Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser
  • NSW Government Gazette
  • Perkins, J. A., Monaro District Items, NLA MS 936
  • Rutledge, Martha, Manning, Sir William Montagu (1811 - 1895), Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/manning-sir-william-montagu-4150
  • Sydney Morning Herald
  • Sydney News

© Angela George and Pat Raymond. All rights reserved.

Images by Heber Perrin. Courtesy of and © Merimbula-Imlay Historical Society Inc. All rights reserved.



Additional Contribution:

A Heritage Assessment of the Pages Creek Dam and Mirador Tramway was completed in 2014 and is available in the public domain at https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/heritageapp/ViewHeritageItemDetails.aspx?ID=1100774 It is reproduced below.

Local Heritage Advisor Angela George considers that it 'is comprised almost entirely of incorrect and/or outdated information'. She has highlighted the statements considered incorrect or outdated and added explanatory footnotes. These are also included below.

Trolley Way Mirador Tramway, Pages Creek Dam Item details


Name of item: Trolley Way Mirador Tramway, Pages Creek Dam

Other name/s: Not known

Type of item: Archaeological-Terrestrial Group/Collection: Transport - Land

Category: Trail/Track

Primary address: Off Mirador Drive, Merimbula, NSW 2548

Parish: Pambula

County: Auckland

Local govt. area: Bega Valley

Boundary: Please refer to site map in images for location


All addresses:

Street Address: Off Mirador Drive

Suburb/town: Merimbula

LGA: Bega Valley

Parish: Pambula

County: Auckland

Type: Primary Address

Statement of significance:

Historically significant for its association with the construction of Munn's Maizena Works and other buildings (see note 1) in Merimbula, possibly dating to as early as the 1860s (2).

The trolley way is locally significant because its physical remains are the only source of further information about itself (3). Archaeological examination of the physical evidence has the potential to reveal information about it and the history of Merimbula that would not be available from any other source. It is likely to be associated with the period of operation of Munn's Maizena works and represents the development of infrastructure to link the maize farms owned by Munn and Twofold Bay Pastoral Company shareholders (4) with the private township, effectively a private trolley way for the private town. As such it remains the last evident example of the establishment of Merimbula as a privately developed town (5).

Its construction and appearance in bush Is also impressive and has a positive aesthetic quality that is compatible with the surrounding natural vegetation. The remains of the water pipe are typical and common and provide no further ability to tell us about the past than can be found from extant records or evidence outside the area. They are therefore of no significance.

Pages Creek Dam

Significant as a privately constructed dam built by Munn in about 1870 – 80 (6) to provide a pure water supply for his Maizena factory. The Maizena works were highly significant in the history of Merimbula, The site has aesthetic value as well as some technical interest and social value to the local community who have lobbied for its recognition and possible incorporation into an interpretation trail. Date significance updated: 24 Mar 2014 Note: The State Heritage Inventory provides information about heritage items listed by local and State government agencies. The State Heritage Inventory is continually being updated by local and State agencies as new information becomes available. Read the OEH copyright and disclaimer.

Description

Designer/Maker: Unknown

Builder/Maker: Not known

Construction years: 0-0

Physical description: There are two sections to the trolley way, one of which is a former trestle bridge that crossed the swamp where Merimbula Creek widens to enter the lagoon. The eastern portion comprises earthworks of stone embankments and cuttings in the hillside. A substantial section of the trolley-way has been damaged to accommodate the Mirador development sewerage pipe. As part of these works several of the gullies have been filled in, with possible damage to the stone abutments.

The dam is located in a deep rainforest gully of Pages Creek several hundred metres to the south of the residential subdivision on the lower side of Casuarina Place, Tura Beach. The attached sketch shows basic construction details of the dam as far as can be ascertained without removal of undergrowth, debris, mud, silt and bulrushes and excavating behind the retaining walls. Probably the floor of the dam is solid rock, rising at the west end where the creek water enters.

There are four 2 inch outlet pipes at the base of the wall. One at the south end with a stop valve still intact and three near the centre of the wall, completely rusted off at the concrete face. A pipe manifold which originally connected to the three pipes, with heavily rusted valves, a relic, fallen to the rock below.

It is understood that the first pipe fitted was of black iron that rusted out and was replaced by a galvanized pipe with a branch across the Back Lagoon to the old Short Point camping ground. There appear to be three pipes following the creek east. Further research will be required to identify the purpose of these. There is also a loose pipe with a 90 degree bend on one end. This may indicate the possible use of a pump to boost the flow.

Pages Creek Dam The main wall is concrete about fourteen metres wide and about two and a half high. There are four x two inch outlet pipes at the base of the wall. Oral history is adamant that the water always flowed by gravity from the dam to a storage facility at Merimbula. The pipe was laid in the centre of the local tramway to provide pure water for Maizena production.

The trestle bridge is evidenced by several pairs of decayed timber posts laid across the lagoon from Merimbula to the Mirador side. The posts are about 1.5 metres above ground level.

The earthworks linked to the end of the bridge. Here the track is roughly straight and rises at an even gradient from its western end to approximately 25-30 metres at its eastern end, for a total length of c. 550 metres.

The track-bed varies from 2 to 5 metres wide and is level. The initial section on the floodplain is an elevated ramp with retaining walls on both sides. As it ascends it is cut into hillsides that are generally 45 degree slope or steeper. Large sections are benched, i.e. cut into the side of the slope; with the rubble used to extend the downslope side outwards. Dry stone retaining walls made of local stone are used on the down slope side. There is some evidence of formed drains along the upslope edge of the tracks.

One section between crossings goes through a 1.5 metres deep cutting. The stone in the cutting does not appear to have been completely removed, suggesting that the track was never completed. There are three gully crossings that appear to have been originally spanned by bridges. The track extends into the gully until it finishes in a squared buttress with a maximum height of 4 metres of dry stone walling. Roughly dressed large dimension logs were embedded in the buttress fill about 1 metre below the surface and formed the bridge decks.

History

Documented history has not come to light (7) and the following account has been prepared by the Merimbula Imlay Historical Society, drawing on oral history and other evidence.

Mathew Munn, who had arrived in Merimbula in 1866 and set up machinery in the old flourmill, was producing cornflour by July 1867. Mathew Munn and his son Armstrong took over the Twofold Bay Pastoral Association (TBPA) share of the partnership and purchased substantial holdings in the area including the land north of Back Lake (Lagoon)

As part of the expansion a large factory was to be built to increase Maizena production. In addition, A.L. Munn required a house prior to his marriage in 1874 and a school would be built commencing in 1870.

It is believed that the stone for the flour mill, built in 1856 by the TBPA had been extracted from two locations, one, a pit cut into solid sandstone beside the lake at the lower end of Munn St, just outside the fence of No. 1 Munn St. The second source was an outcrop of sandstone on what is now the Sunny Waters Estate. A very large amount of stone was now required for the factory and other future buildings.

Outcropping stone was much easier to access than the unweathered and probably stronger stone that could be cut from a quarry. The decision must have been made back in the 1860s that the outcropping stone was satisfactory for the rubble walls of buildings, with quarried stone for lintels and face work. Chappie Munn indicates that all three sources of stone were used in the buildings. Hence the need for a means of transporting stone from the side of the hill below Mirador to a point where it could be loaded onto drays and delivered to the various building sites in Merimbula. The large amount of stone needed for the factory as well as for the school and Munn's house would certainly justify the cost of constructing the trolley way.(8) Bret Lowe records in his section on Captain John Grant in Tales of the Far South Coast (Evans M&N, 2003) "For several years Grant traded a ship between Sydney and Pambula, visiting the ports of Tathra and Bermagui. He also assisted in ferrying stone across Merimbula Lake for Munn's Maizena Works and the Bacon Factory (9)" (p22).

The use of the trolley-way alignment to lay a water supply pipe from Pages Creek dam appears to be a later and incidental use.

Physical condition and/or Archaeological potential: Generally good

Pages Creek Dam Metal pipes have rusted but otherwise the dam is in robust condition and continues to hold water. Vegetation has grown over the rear side walls and needs to be cleared away.

Date condition updated:24 Mar 14

Modifications and dates: The dam appears to be largely as constructed and hence integrity is high.

Further information: Not known

Current use: Easement for a pipe

Former use: Tramway

History

Historical notes: Documented history has not come to light (10) and the following account has been prepared by the Merimbula Imlay Historical Society, drawing on oral history and other evidence.

Mathew Munn, who had arrived in Merimbula in 1866 and set up machinery in the old flourmill, was producing cornflour by July 1867. Mathew Munn and his son Armstrong took over the Twofold Bay Pastoral Association (TBPA) share of the partnership and purchased substantial holdings in the area including the land north of Back Lake (Lagoon)

As part of the expansion a large factory was to be built to increase Maizena production (11). In addition, A.L. Munn required a house prior to his marriage in 1874 and a school would be built commencing in 1870 (12).

It is believed that the stone for the flour mill, built in 1856 by the TBPA (13) had been extracted from two locations, one, a pit cut into solid sandstone beside the lake at the lower end of Munn St, just outside the fence of No. 1 Munn St. The second source was an outcrop of sandstone on what is now the Sunny Waters Estate. A very large amount of stone was now required for the factory and other future buildings.

Outcropping stone was much easier to access than the unweathered and probably stronger stone that could be cut from a quarry. The decision must have been made back in the 1860s that the outcropping stone was satisfactory for the rubble walls of buildings, with quarried stone for lintels and face work. Chappie Munn indicates that all three sources of stone were used in the buildings. Hence the need for a means of transporting stone from the side of the hill below Mirador to a point where it could be loaded onto drays and delivered to the various building sites in Merimbula. The large amount of stone needed for the factory as well as for the school and Munn's house would certainly justify the cost of constructing the trolley way (14). Bret Lowe records in his section on Captain John Grant in Tales of the Far South Coast (Evans M&N, 2003) "For several years Grant traded a ship between Sydney and Pambula, visiting the ports of Tathra and Bermagui. He also assisted in ferrying stone across Merimbula Lake for Munn's Maizena Works and the Bacon Factory (15)" (p22).

The use of the trolley-way alignment to lay a water supply pipe from Pages Creek dam appears to be a later and incidental use.

Construction of the dam probably post-dated the tramway which itself seems to date from the 1870s (16). The tramway was apparently used to deliver stone for construction of the Old School house, Courunga and the Maizena mill.(17)


Notes provided by Angela George, August 2019:

1 Not associated with the construction of Munn’s Maizena or any other buildings in Merimbula.

2 Dates from 1883.

3 See for example excerpt from Town and Country Journal, May 1883; excerpt from Bega Standard, November 1883; Bega Standard excerpt, October 1884; all quoted in the dossier file submitted in April 2019.

4 Trolley way has no association with the Twofold Bay Pastoral Association.

5 This ignores, for example, the old school building.

6 mid-1880s.

7 See newspaper articles noted in footnote (11), quoted in the dossier file submitted in April 2019.

8 Trolley way not constructed for the transportation of stone but to cart maize from Munn’s farms to the maizena works.

9 Grant died in 1919, bacon factory didn’t open until 1922.

10 See footnotes (11) and (15)

11 Maizena factory used the 1858 built wheaten flour mill, undertaking extensions at various points.

12 No association between the stone used for building works throughout Merimbula and the trolley way.

13 Built in 1858.

14 Trolley way used to transport maize grown on Munn’s farm at Bournda to the maizena mill, not stone quarried for building purposes.

15 Misleading as Grant died in 1919 and the bacon factory began operations in 1922.

16 Tramway dates from 1883.

17 Tramway not used to transport stone for building works but rather maize from Munn’s Bournda farm.


Recommended management:

Recommendations

Management Category Description Date Updated

Statutory Instrument List on a Local Environmental Plan (LEP) 18 Jun 13

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Listings

Heritage Listing Listing Title Listing Number Gazette Date Gazette Number Gazette Page

Local Environmental Plan Bega Valley LEP 2013 I734 02 Aug 13 408 103

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Study details

Title Year Number Author Inspected by Guidelines used

Merimbula Heritage Inventory 2005 Pip Giovanelli No

Bega Valley Shire Heritage Study 2006 Pip Giovanelli No

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References, internet links & images

None


Note: internet links may be to web pages, documents or images.


Data source

The information for this entry comes from the following source:

Name: Local Government

Database number: 1100774

________________________________________


Every effort has been made to ensure that information contained in the State Heritage Inventory is correct. If you find any errors or omissions please send your comments to the Database Manager.

All information and pictures on this page are the copyright of the Heritage Division or respective copyright owners.


This Bega Shire Hidden Heritage project has been made possible by the NSW Government through its Heritage Near Me program.

Any further information relating to this object or to associated topics will be GREATLY welcomed and will be added to the above library of information. Please email your contribution to southcoasthistory@yahoo.com

Location

Mirador Drive, Tura Beach NSW 2548